Water Graphic-California's New Permanent Water Regulations Explained

California’s New Permanent Water Regulations Explained

We explain California’s new permanent water regulations, in plain language.
Why it was passed. Its effect on you. Below there is a link to resources that will help you conserve.
And, we squish one ridiculous myth flying around the web!

Freshly signed into law by Governor Brown, the bills now make water conservation “a way of life” in California. 
Bills AB 1668 and SB 606 aim to reduce water usage by twenty percent, per capita by December 31, 2020.

Background 

*Climate modeling by Climate Scientist Daniel Swain uncovers another trend – drier autumns with a late onset of the rainy season and a corresponding drier spring.  Source:  published in Nature Climate Change.   

Who is affected?
All California residents.

Why?

A high probability of future extreme drought conditions and the need to plan for them.

It will motivate agencies to repair old and inefficient infrastructure.

What do I need to know?

The state mandates local water agencies to establish water use targets based on their respective region’s climate, land use and population. 

  • Indoor water use limit of 55 gallons per person, per day through January 1, 2025.**
  • Outdoor water usage standards are not developed yet.  (includes landscapes and pools).  DWR will study climate and landscapes around the state to determine guidelines.
  • Commercial, institutional and industrial standards will be defined by 2021.

**East Bay Municipal Water District website, see link below, has information to help you calculate your own water usage.  There’s also a handy table that lists water usage for showers, sinks, washers and other household appliances.

East Bay Municipal Water District Web Page Link

Separating Myth from Fact

Myth

You can’t shower and wash clothes on the same day.

Fact

Not true.

Most washers now use only 9 to, at the most, 26 gallons of water.

An average shower for 8 minutes uses 17 gallons of water. 

Some Perspective

Average per capita = per person.

San Francisco’s average water use is less than 55 gallons per person, per day.

There was a 55-gallon standard set for indoor use set almost 10 years ago.

The 55-gallon limit is more than what is allowed in some countries in Europe.

There are numerous water crises in urban centers all over the world. Water pollution accounts for many of them.  Others, a result of extreme drought.  In all cases, experts say, poor water management is the reason it became a crisis.  Cape Town was expected to run out of water earlier this year, but a last-ditch policy of severe rationing  narrowly avoided a catastrophe.  The city’s doomsday alarm clock was reset for next year.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This confirms what we expected after a ferocious rainy season that wreaked havoc throughout much the state. 

Key facts:

  • Just one year ago only 5% of the state was drought free
  • Sierra snowpack stands at 179% of its historic average (the biggest in 22 years)
  • San Joaquin Valley and most of Southern California remains in a “moderate drought”.
  • Much of Santa Barbara and Ventura county areas is in severe drought or extreme drought. Although that statistic is down from 2016.

In case you want to know where your water comes a KQED website has an interactive map.  Check it out.

Do you want to know where your water comes from?

Left: Map of 2015
Right: Map of 2017

The list below give you an in depth look at how full our reservoirs are

Reservoir

Status

Serves

Note

San Pablo Creek

130%*

East Bay

Also Briones, Lake Chabot, Lafayette -all full.

San Leandro Creek

127%*

East Bay

 

Lake Mendocino

109%

Northbay

 

Lake Sonoma

100+%

Northbay

 

Marin Reservoirs

100%

MMWD

 

San Andreas Creek

129%*

SF and Peninsula

 

Crystal Springs

127%*

 SF and Peninsula

 

*based on 2017 average percentage capacity

Felicia Marcus, Chair of the State Water Board has expressed relief that water conditions have improved so dramatically, but state policy makers remain cautious.  They voted to continue with mild drought rules and re-evaluate in May.  We will know more about any irrigation regulations by that time.  And, water conservation will likely to be an important issue.

At this time:

Water agencies are still required to report use each month

Wasteful practices such as hosing off pavements and use of hoses without nozzles remain banned.

Sources for this article: San Jose Mercury News, NOAA, KQED.

 

faucet

San Francisco Bay Area – The California Department of Water Resources reminds us that it’s time to turn off your irrigation!

The rains we have had and forecasts for more are sufficient in the short term. Remember that trees, shrubs and flowers use less water in the winter.  One inch of rain is enough moisture to eliminate the need for irrigation in your landscape for at least a few weeks.

On the other hand, we don’t know for sure what the weather gods have in store much beyond this week’s forecasted drenching. Keep an eye out for your plants and water if you notice them looking drought stressed.

Check out the Department of Water Resources for more information.

 

 

droughtmapkeyfinal

Gardeners’ Guild is obsessed with weather.  Well – we are a landscape contracting company and we must adapt on a moment’s notice to rain, high winds and unseasonable heat or frost.  We also stay on top of long term forecasting because our clients depend on us to help them manage their resources.

I personally am obsessed with it. One, I need to since our San Francisco Bay Area readers are.  And two, I find it fascinating. 

Our recent heavy rain seems to suggest a wet winter.  Yes! More is predicted this weekend.  Will our reservoirs be full by next spring?  An article in the San Jose Mercury News and the most recent post on weatherwest.com has some indications based on weather forecast modeling.

We are still officially in a drought, however.  If you look at the map above you can see why.

However, there are parts of the Bay Area that have been downgraded to just “abnormally dry”.  These counties are Sonoma, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Cruz, Western Napa and Western Santa Clara. Unfortunately, Santa Clara County, as well as Contra Costa, Alameda, Solano, San Benito and Monterey remain officially in a drought. 

Water experts say that it would take a “very wet winter – all across the state – or perhaps two wet years – to end the drought statewide.

Forecasting from weatherwest.com post on October 25th described conflicting information that obscures any long term rainy season forecast. In his article, Daniel Swain says that climate modeling suggests a few possibilities:

  • Another Pacific high pressure ridge again
  • A warm winter
  • A possibility that Northern California’s will enjoy more precipitation than Southern California

Swain, in his last post, suggested that a La Niña was less likely. But his October article says we are “edging back to a La Niña-like” event. His evidence is cool water in the eastern Pacific and a warming trend for the tropical West Pacific.  This, he says is linked to an unusually high pressure system.

I wish could pass on better news.  And, of course we don’t know for sure.  That’s kind of frustrating. So continue rain dances, visualizing and we will continue offering advice on water conservation and irrigation that saves water.

The California drought map shown above represents the state as of November 10th. (2016). 

Some additional facts about the rain in October:
The October drenching was the wettest since 1921
San Francisco ‘s rainfall was 209% of average
But, the soil was dry and therefore the rain did not increase water levels as much as you would think. 

Sources:
Weatherwest.com
San Jose Mercury News

waterrebateart

SFPUC

Local Regulations

  • 10% voluntary reduction in water use compared to 2013 – all SFPUC customers. 
  • 25% reduction of landscape watering lifted as of July 1, 2016
  • Revert wastewater flow factors back to their original adjustments, effective July 1, 2016.

Prohibited water activities (State Requirements)

  • Watering outdoor landscapes that causes runoff to sidewalks, streets, and hardscapes
  • Using a hose without a shut-off nozzle
  • No washing of driveways, sidewalks or hardscape; except as needed for health and safety or to meet City of San Francisco standards
  • Using drinking water for soil compaction, dust control, or other non-essential construction purposes if non-potable water is available.
  • Watering outdoor landscapes with potable water during and within forty-eight (48) hours after a rain event.
  • Watering with potable water of ornamental turf on public street medians; 
  • Inefficient irrigation of landscapes outside of new homes and buildings
  • Using drinking water in non-recirculating fountains or decorative water devices. 

SFPUC Watering Recommendations

For a typical San Francisco property, reducing watering to once or twice a week, and/or the amount time that watering occurs, will help ensure efficient water use while keeping plants alive.

For steeply sloped areas, watering should be done in multiple start times to avoid runoff. Watering for 5 minutes, turn off for an hour, and then water again for another 5 minutes results in better absorption than 10 minutes straight. Consider replacing grass or high water use plants with drought-tolerant species or converting to drip irrigation.

REBATE$

Residential turf replacement program

Residential Graywater systems

Large landscape improvement grants – this however, is for half acre minimum and has very specific guidelines (new) and applications are due October 22nd.*

*GGI note: this guidelines are lengthy and complex.  See SFPUC website for details.

The above was reprinted and summarized from SFPUC website.

MMWD

75% of their water supply comes from local reservoirs that, when full, provide only about two years of water.  They continue to ask customers to voluntarily conserve.

REBATE$

State of California Rebates

$2/square foot turf removal rebate for residential customers

They are continuing the following outdoor restrictions:

  • Using a garden hose without a shut-off nozzle
  • Landscape irrigation between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
  • Irrigating any ornamental landscape or turf areas more than three days in any week.
  • Applying potable water to outdoor landscapes during and within 48 hours after measurable rainfall.

Contact MMWD office with any questions (415) 945-1520.

EBMUD

Continuing Restrictions

The following outdoor watering restrictions are in effect.

  • Repair leaks 
  • Landscape watering that runs off on sidewalks, streets and hardscapes.
  • No washing of driveways and sidewalks; except as needed for health and safety.
  • Only hoses with shutoff nozzles are allowed.
  • Fountains or decorative water features must use recirculated water.
  • No irrigating ornamental turf on public street medians.
  • No watering of outdoor landscapes within 48 hours of rainfall.

For more information

REBATE$

Residential

Lawn Conversion & Irrigation Upgrade Rebates

Get up to $2,500 for converting lawns and upgrading irrigation equipment at single-family homes and multi-family residences of 4 units of less.

The Magic of Mulch 

Save water, beautify your garden, and enhance soil health with mulch.

Graywater Rebate

Get a rebate of up to $50 for purchase of a graywater system 3-way diverter valve.

HOAs

Lawn Conversion and Irrigation Upgrades

Multi-family properties: up to $20,000 for 5 units or more; up to $2,500 for 4 units or less (includes drip irrigation, high-efficiency nozzles, pressure regulators, submeters and lawn conversion.)

Commercial Properties

Up to $2,500 (single-family and multi-family residences of 4 units or less)
Up to $20,000 (commercial sites and multi-family residences of 5 or more units)

SANTA ROSA WATER AGENCY

June 14th voted to lift mandatory water restrictions

REBATE$

For turf conversion and/or improving the efficiency of your irrigation system
Graywater rebate program
Rainwater harvesting

For more information

SOLANO COUNTY WATER AGENCY

REBATE$
Smart Irrigation Controller Rebates
Install a qualifying smart controller to irrigate your existing landscape and you could receive up to $300, $700, or $1000 depending on the number of stations.

Go to: www.waterprograms.com/solano or call 855.512.1221 

Water-Efficient Landscaping Rebates
Replace your lawn with water-efficient landscaping and receive $1.00/square foot, up to $1000 maximum; see Turf Replacement Rebate Program and check out FAQs about the Landscape Rebate Program. Please read the terms and conditions before you remove your lawn. Contact 707.455.1113 or solanocash4grass@scwa2.com for details. 

Gardeners’ Guild works in the above areas including Napa, Sonoma County, Marin, San Francisco, East Bay and Solano County.

We have a dedicated irrigation division and can diagnose, repair, design an irrigation system. Our awards since the mid 1980’s demonstrate we’ve been ahead of the pack in our long term planning that water management would be one of the most important issues of our time.

Call us at 510-439-3700 or 415-457-0400