Sonoma and Napa Fires are the backdrop of this firey sunset in Novato

Fiery Sunset North Bay Sunset October 17, 2017

Wildfire Readiness – 5-Step Plan for the Bay Area

The essentials of what you can do now – including a list of the most fire-prone plants

Though it is wet today, the forecast shows temperatures steadily climbing, into the 90’s through next week.  In fact, according to Daniel Swain, weatherwest.com,  we may be headed toward an extended heat wave late September into October.  Raising the risk of wildfire.  

Because the threat remains and the media reports can be overwhelming,we’ve broken it into useful chunks – just a 5 step wildfire readiness plan – only the essentials you need for this late September.

This 5-Step Plan for wildfire readiness were adapted from literature provided state and bay area cities

  • County by county links for emergency alert sign ups
  • Evacuation checklist
  • Inspection by your local fire department
  • Debris removal
  • Removal of flammable plants and debris around your home or building

The list above is a short term strategy.  The details below explain what to do, starting with making sure you are set up for emergency notifications.

1. Sign up for Emergency Notifications

If you haven’t already, sign up now.

Nixle
It will alert you to any emergency events and evacuations in your area. You will also receive non-emergency alerts about local criminal activity.  Those messages can be annoying, but trust me, Nixle is an invaluable system.

Cal Fire emergency notification sign up, no matter where you are in the state

Sonoma County alert system

San Francisco alert system sign up

Contra Costa County emergency warning system

Alert Marin warning system sign up

Napa County emergency warning

Alameda County emergency alert

Alert Solano warning system sign up

Understanding the categories of alert messages

Evacuation order: Means evacuate now do not delay to gather belongings.  Fire expected in less than an hour. 
Evacuation warning: Evacuate soon, but there is time to gather belongings quickly.
Shelter in place: It is safer to stay in your current location. 

2. Evacuation Checklist

The checklist – linked below from the County of Marin, will help you prepare. They have the best one I’ve seen, it has pre-planning checklist in addition to a list for your “go bag”.  Plus a family communications plan.

Make copies of important documents like passports, insurance policies, birth certificates, drivers licenses, property deed and mortgage papers.
Some people put them in a safe deposit box.

Where to Purchase Disaster Supplies

If you are looking for reviews and advice on where to purchase disaster supplies, the list below can help.

Wirecutter, which is a New York Times Company has much information about where to purchase, costs including for pre-assembled kits. 

Aside from the above, there are local big box stores where you can purchase emergency supplies.

Costco

Home Depot

3. Local Fire Department Safety Check

If you have questions about your property call your local fire department.  Find out if they will do a check of your home’s exterior.  They will make recommendations for any vegetation that should be cleared.

4. Debris Removal

The State of California recommends removing debris like dead leaves because they will quickly ignite.

Clear your roof
Remove dead leaves and debris from your roof and gutters
Keep branches 10 feet from your chimney
Cover your chimney outlet and stovepipe with a nonflammable screen of 1/2″ mesh

Dry leaves on roof - they are a fire hazard

Get dry leaves off your roof!

Landscape and Debris Cleaning
Remove all debris, i.e., fallen leaves, dead plants, construction materials away from structures
Stack woodpiles at least 30 feet from structures
Move liquefied petroleum gas containers to a minimum of 10 feet from structures

Create a Defensible Space (See detailed version for more information)
The law requires every home have a 100-foot defensible space around it

Zone 1-up to 30 feet
Remove all dead plants, grass, and leaves.
Remove dead dry leaves; pine needles from rain gutters and roof.
Remove tree branches from your chimney, and the ones that are hanging over your roof.

Zone 2 – up to 100 feet
The remaining 70 feet should be a “reduced fuel zone.”
Cut or mow grass to a maximum height of 4 inches.
Create horizontal and vertical space between shrubs and trees.
Keep plants well hydrated.

How to Use Equipment Properly
Mow grass before 10 am.
A string trimmer is safer for clearing vegetation than a mower.
Never on Red Flag days or when it is windy, hot and dry.
Spark arrestors* should be installed on all portable, gas-powered equipment.
*A spark arrestor prevents the emission of flammable debris.

5. Remove These Fire Prone Plants*

The most fire prone plants have similar characteristics
High oil or resin content. 
May have fine needles or lacey leaves.
Abundant and dry leaves underneath or leaves with low moisture content.

This list represents the most flammable of plants.

Juniper – highly flammable – will burn even when wet
Acacia
Bamboo
Cypress
Fountaingrass
Scotch, French or Spanish broom -Highly flammable, invasive weeds
Douglas Fir Trees
Rosemary

*Keep your plants watered, because even the most fire resistant plant will burn if it is dry.

Sources for this article

Cal Fire
Fire Safe Marin
Firewise USA

Marin Conservation League

 

Sonoma and Napa Fires are the backdrop of this firey sunset in Novato

Fiery Sunset in Black Point Novato October 17, 2017

Four Essential Actions for Wildfire Preparation

Plus the Secret Ingredient to Effective Preparation

Wind and warmer weather underlines the threat of wildfire for the rest of October.  This month is usually the worst, but if warming conditions prevail, “wildfire risk could rise again before winter rains arrive in earnest,” says Weatherwest.com.

Preparing for wildfire is a combination of prevention (a longer-term solution) and short-term preparation. 
Below are four essential short-term actions you can take now. 
They will minimize the risk to you and your home.

I have first-hand knowledge of wildfire preparation and prevention. 
Living in a North Bay community designated as “at risk” for wildfire, I am well versed in both prevention and preparation.  The unnerving “Red Flag” warnings from Nixle (learn about them below) reminds us to stay focused on safety. We are a proactive group.  And, so far, we’ve been fortunate. 

Following FireSafe Marin guidelines, our neighborhood works together trimming trees, scheduling fire department consultations and following their recommended activities. 

This coming weekend is our second “chipper day.”  Funded by a grant, our Fire Department will send out a chipper and crew to dispose of the trimmings from cut trees and shrubs.  Hand-made signs posted throughout our neighborhood are friendly reminders for taking action. 

I believe that what has made us successful (the secret ingredient) is teamwork. Working together with a common goal of fighting danger.  As a group we’ve been more effective than as individuals.

The four activities below are the essentials of what you can do now.  There is also an evacuation checklist you can use.

Preparation
Sign up for Emergency Notifications

If you haven’t already, sign up now.

Nixle
It will alert you to any emergency events and evacuations in your area. You will also receive non-emergency alerts about local criminal activity.  Those messages can be annoying, but trust me, Nixle is an invaluable system.

County Notification
This link from ABC7 news will direct you to where and how to sign up for your county.
Your county may give you options, i.e., text, phone or VOIP, on how messages may be received.

Decoding alert messages

Evacuation order: Means evacuate now do not delay to gather belongings.  Fire expected in less than an hour. 
Evacuation warning: Evacuate soon, but there is time to gather belongings quickly.
Shelter in place: It is safer to stay in your current location. 

Preparation
What to know – Resources

Know your neighborhood escape route. Work with family and neighbors if applicable.
Make copies of important documents like passports, insurance policies, birth certificates. Then put them in a safe deposit box.
Fire Department Risk Assessment Request a visit your local Fire Department representative for a free vegetation management inspection.
Cal Fire has a comprehensive brochure and checklists

Preparation
Pack a “Go Bag” Put it in your Vehicle*

What to pack and where to find items you will need

*This list was adapted from FireSafe Marin. They also have a comprehensive checklist.

Preparation
Where to Purchase Disaster Supplies

If you are looking for reviews and advice on where to purchase disaster supplies, the list below can help.

Wirecutter, which is a New York Times Company has much information about where to purchase, costs and what is in pre-assembled kits. 

Aside from the above, there are local big box stores where you can purchase emergency supplies.

Costco

Home Depot

Prepare
Outside Debris Removal

Clear your roof
Remove dead leaves and debris from your roof and gutters
Keep branches 10 feet from your chimney
Cover your chimney outlet and stovepipe with a nonflammable screen of 1/2″ mesh

Dry leaves on roof - they are a fire hazard

Get dry leaves off your roof!

Landscape and Debris Cleaning
Remove all debris, i.e., fallen leaves, dead plants, construction materials away from structures
Stack woodpiles at least 30 feet from structures
Move liquefied petroleum gas containers to a minimum of 10 feet from structures

Create a Defensible Space (See detailed version for more information)
The law requires every home have a 100-foot defensible space around it

Zone 1-up to 30 feet
Remove all dead plants, grass, and leaves.
Remove dead dry leaves; pine needles from rain gutters and roof.
Remove tree branches from your chimney, and the ones that are hanging over your roof.

Zone 2 – up to 100 feet
The remaining 70 feet should be a “reduced fuel zone.”
Cut or mow grass to a maximum height of 4 inches.
Create horizontal space between shrubs and trees.
Create vertical spacing between shrubs and trees.
Keep plants well hydrated.

How to Use Equipment Properly
Mow grass before 10 am.
A string trimmer is safer for clearing vegetation than a mower.
Never on Red Flag days or when it is windy, hot and dry.
Spark arrestors* should be installed on all portable, gas-powered equipment.
*A spark arrestor prevents the emission of flammable debris.

The Difference a Team Makes

Our community’s “at risk” status didn’t register when I bought my house nine years ago.  The only inkling about our prospects was a faded road sign that said “Keep up Your Fire Safety Efforts” and a neighbor’s stray comment that we “have fire drills every other year or so”. 

Then came October 2017.  The Napa fire.  Santa Rosa.  And, a couple of terrifyingly close-call fires on Highway 37. A harbinger of summers to follow. I felt scared; powerless over the whims of a warming climate.  Then I discovered working with my neighbors.  Planning and talking about solutions to minimize risk, as a group, changed my perception of the potential dangers.  Though I have no control over climate conditions, I feel safer now.  Ultimately, battling Mother Nature as a team made a difference.

Sources for this article

Cal Fire
Fire Safe Marin
Firewise USA

Additional Resources, checklists, graphics
Cal Fire Homeowners Checklist (short and long-term strategies)

 

Water Graphic-California's New Permanent Water Regulations Explained

California’s New Permanent Water Regulations Explained

We explain California’s new permanent water regulations, in plain language.
Why it was passed. Its effect on you. Below there is a link to resources that will help you conserve.
And, we squish one ridiculous myth flying around the web!

Freshly signed into law by Governor Brown, the bills now make water conservation “a way of life” in California. 
Bills AB 1668 and SB 606 aim to reduce water usage by twenty percent, per capita by December 31, 2020.

Background 

*Climate modeling by Climate Scientist Daniel Swain uncovers another trend – drier autumns with a late onset of the rainy season and a corresponding drier spring.  Source:  published in Nature Climate Change.   

Who is affected?
All California residents.

Why?

A high probability of future extreme drought conditions and the need to plan for them.

It will motivate agencies to repair old and inefficient infrastructure.

What do I need to know?

The state mandates local water agencies to establish water use targets based on their respective region’s climate, land use and population. 

  • Indoor water use limit of 55 gallons per person, per day through January 1, 2025.**
  • Outdoor water usage standards are not developed yet.  (includes landscapes and pools).  DWR will study climate and landscapes around the state to determine guidelines.
  • Commercial, institutional and industrial standards will be defined by 2021.

**East Bay Municipal Water District website, see link below, has information to help you calculate your own water usage.  There’s also a handy table that lists water usage for showers, sinks, washers and other household appliances.

East Bay Municipal Water District Web Page Link

Separating Myth from Fact

Myth

You can’t shower and wash clothes on the same day.

Fact

Not true.

Most washers now use only 9 to, at the most, 26 gallons of water.

An average shower for 8 minutes uses 17 gallons of water. 

Some Perspective

Average per capita = per person.

San Francisco’s average water use is less than 55 gallons per person, per day.

There was a 55-gallon standard set for indoor use set almost 10 years ago.

The 55-gallon limit is more than what is allowed in some countries in Europe.

There are numerous water crises in urban centers all over the world. Water pollution accounts for many of them.  Others, a result of extreme drought.  In all cases, experts say, poor water management is the reason it became a crisis.  Cape Town was expected to run out of water earlier this year, but a last-ditch policy of severe rationing  narrowly avoided a catastrophe.  The city’s doomsday alarm clock was reset for next year.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This confirms what we expected after a ferocious rainy season that wreaked havoc throughout much the state. 

Key facts:

  • Just one year ago only 5% of the state was drought free
  • Sierra snowpack stands at 179% of its historic average (the biggest in 22 years)
  • San Joaquin Valley and most of Southern California remains in a “moderate drought”.
  • Much of Santa Barbara and Ventura county areas is in severe drought or extreme drought. Although that statistic is down from 2016.

In case you want to know where your water comes a KQED website has an interactive map.  Check it out.

Do you want to know where your water comes from?

Left: Map of 2015
Right: Map of 2017

The list below give you an in depth look at how full our reservoirs are

Reservoir

Status

Serves

Note

San Pablo Creek

130%*

East Bay

Also Briones, Lake Chabot, Lafayette -all full.

San Leandro Creek

127%*

East Bay

 

Lake Mendocino

109%

Northbay

 

Lake Sonoma

100+%

Northbay

 

Marin Reservoirs

100%

MMWD

 

San Andreas Creek

129%*

SF and Peninsula

 

Crystal Springs

127%*

 SF and Peninsula

 

*based on 2017 average percentage capacity

Felicia Marcus, Chair of the State Water Board has expressed relief that water conditions have improved so dramatically, but state policy makers remain cautious.  They voted to continue with mild drought rules and re-evaluate in May.  We will know more about any irrigation regulations by that time.  And, water conservation will likely to be an important issue.

At this time:

Water agencies are still required to report use each month

Wasteful practices such as hosing off pavements and use of hoses without nozzles remain banned.

Sources for this article: San Jose Mercury News, NOAA, KQED.

 

faucet

San Francisco Bay Area – The California Department of Water Resources reminds us that it’s time to turn off your irrigation!

The rains we have had and forecasts for more are sufficient in the short term. Remember that trees, shrubs and flowers use less water in the winter.  One inch of rain is enough moisture to eliminate the need for irrigation in your landscape for at least a few weeks.

On the other hand, we don’t know for sure what the weather gods have in store much beyond this week’s forecasted drenching. Keep an eye out for your plants and water if you notice them looking drought stressed.

Check out the Department of Water Resources for more information.